RFID Solved

Q?

What are the benefits of Passive UHF RFID over LF and HF systems?

A.

The read range of passive UHF systems can be as long as 12m, and UHF RFID has a faster data transfer rate than LF or HF. UHF RFID is the most sensitive to interference, but many UHF product manufacturers have developed ways of designing tags, antennas, and readers to keep performance high even in difficult environments. Passive UHF tags are easier and cheaper to manufacturer than LF and HF tags.

UHF RFID is used in a wide variety of applications ranging from retail inventory management, to pharmaceutical anti-counterfeiting, to wireless device configuration. The bulk of new RFID projects are using UHF opposed to LF or HF, making UHF the fastest growing segment of the RFID market. Unlike LF and HF frequency bands, the UHF frequency band is regulated by a single global standard called the ECPglobal Gen2 UHF (ISO 18000-6C) Standard. This allows for interoperability of vendor products and greater system flexibility.

Q?

What is the Internet of Things (IoT)?

A.

The internet of Things (IoT) is an environment in which objects, animals or people are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-machine/computer interaction. IoT has evolved from the convergence of wireless technologies, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and in the Internet.

Q?

What are the advantages of RFID technology compared to barcode technology?

A.

RFID technology has been adopted in a broad range of applications because it offers a number of unique advantages over barcode. Most importantly, RFID does not require direct line of sight for tags to be accurately scanned and read, offering a substantial reduction in handling time with improved accuracy.

The use of RFID streamlines distribution and inventory management for reliable and accurate deliveries, item level tracking, and bulk reading of stock up to 85 percent faster. Likewise, accurate inventory can be accomplished in about one-tenth the time, whether in the stock room or on the sales floor.

Q?

What are some of the most common applications for RFID?

A.

RFID can be used to track just about any type of physical object. It is used for everything from tracking livestock to runners crossing a marathon finish line. The most common applications are tracking goods in the supply chain, reusable containers, high-value assets and tools, and other items moving through a manufacturing production line or distribution center.

Q?

Can RFID make my businesses operations more efficient?

A.

Identifying objects and items using RFID technology requires less work than using human employees and/or other data capture technologies such as barcodes. As a result, the implementation of RFID technologies leads to greater process effectiveness in many redundant operational tasks such as the receiving, stocking and inventorying of goods.

Q?

How is RFID being used today?

A.

RFID is being used for many purposes including Raw material tracking, work-in-process tracking, pallet/box tracking, parcel package tracking, unique item traceability, and inventory management.

Many of the organizations adopting RFID technology are early adopters and view use of the technology as a competitive advantage in their respective industries and markets. As a result, many have been hesitant to publicize how they are using the technology specifically.

Q?

What is the difference between active and passive tags?

A.

Active RFID tags require an on-board power source such as a battery in order to operate. Passive RFID tags have no battery and don’t require an on-board power source. Passive tags draw power from the reader. Each type of RFID tag serves its own purpose and has unique benefits. For specific questions about which type of tag is best for your application, we recommend that you contact your TransTech Systems account manager for guidance.